Insurance

New Hampshire law makes a business accountable if it serves alcohol to an obviously intoxicated person.  In New Hampshire, this legal protection is found in a statute: RSA 507-F “Alcoholic Beverage Licensee Liability.” Such a legal proceeding is commonly referred to as a “Dram Shop” action. The protections provided by this law often come into

We live in a world where innovation is constant.  We hear about self-driving cars, personal and private data that is stored in a “cloud” that we cannot see, and financial transactions are made largely without the use of currency.  What do these changes mean with respect to personal injury cases in the years to come? 

Passenger Claims

How does a passenger in a car crash recover damages when the driver of the vehicle is found “at fault”? Passenger claims carry a certain stigma because they are often cast as “suing” a person with a close relationship to the passenger, such as a husband or friend.  This characterization is beneficial to insurers who

The laws in New Hampshire do not require that vehicle owners maintain automobile insurance.  Setting the wisdom of that policy aside, many individuals in New Hampshire unexpectedly have this problem when they are injured by negligent drivers who don’t have insurance.  Where does one turn when they are faced with such a scenario?    The

Invisible Insurance

When you bring suit to recover for injuries caused by someone else, you sue the responsible party. You may not name the responsible party’s insurance company in the suit.  In fact, if reference is made in the presence of the jury to the fact that there was insurance, a mistrial would be declared. The judicial

What is my Personal Injury Case Worth?

A personal injury lawyer is often asked early on what the value of a case is. I sometimes respond by asking the client what a car in our parking lot is worth.  A client naturally asks how old the car is, what shape the body is in, what the make and model are, what the

Invisible Insurance

When you bring suit to recover for injuries caused by someone else, you sue the responsible party.  You may not name the responsible party’s insurance company in the suit.  In fact, if reference is made in the presence of the jury to the fact that there was insurance, a mistrial would be declared. The judicial

Kudos if you caught the Expose song reference in the title. I’m actually not sure how it spilled out of my head. It is, however, appropriate for this writing. Over the years, I’ve seen that certain issues at associations claim popularity in a cyclical fashion. Recently, I had occasion to discuss “rules” several times. Taking

As a condominium practitioner representing associations in both MA and NH, I often find it interesting to compare differences in the laws of the Commonwealth and the Granite State. While I believe that most would readily lean towards NH as the state with the edge on natural resources and beauty, in terms of their respective

Insurance companies are constantly finding new ways to entice potential customers to shop for insurance.  One of the latest tactics is to permit shoppers to “pick their price.”  This marketing scheme is a trap for the unwary.  Here’s why: Nearly everyone wants to pay less for their insurance.  The less we pay them, the more